Friday, May 11

A Query.

This has irked me all day.

Why do water tanks have corrugated sides??

I watched a truck with water tanks for delivery, & remembered all the tanks I have seen - & they are many, being the latest necessary accessory for a house, because of the water crisis we currently have...(mainly due to short sighted planning...oops, I will probably be arrested for that!)

I suppose there must be some website I could go to, where all would be revealed.
But that is not as much fun, is it, as asking friends on the Internet???

11 comments:

nutmeg said...

Sorry Meggie, I don't have an answer to this post but I was just reading the last couple of days worth and a few things struck me.

I give thanks every day (or try to remember to at least!) that my girls are healthy and whole. I think if we are truthful alot of us harbour fears about having a child that is otherwise. I think our fears are based on us not thinking we could handle it. It would be very, very hard; but we could handle it but it is not unreasonable to think that we may not. I am glad you shared that story. Also the one about the black cat - my howie, who passed on last year had a similar reception from me after the first child was born - and sometimes in my worst moments I think I killed him as I "forgot" to look after him well enough.

Lee said...

Water tanks are corrugated to give them more strength. In theory, at least. Some of the more modern plastic ones have a variety of odd shapes but still are designed to resist the pressure that the height of water in the tank puts on walls of the tank.

Mrs. Goodneedle said...

Great question, I don't know but would guess for strength reasons?

Alice said...

My guess is certainly for reasons of strength. I doubt that you will ever see a tank with straight sides - at least, not a large tank anyway. Nowadays there is such a variety of styles and shapes.

Angie said...

Love your question, Meggie, and I bet Lee has just given you the answer! :) I don't have a water tank, altho I would love to have one and attach it to my gutter to catch the rain when it falls. However, my DH has these ideas of what looks right with a house and what doesn't...wonder if his thoughts would change if we were in serious drought conditions. Our weather people keep saying we are, and as I try to dig this dry, hard earth I have to agree with them. But still his answer to a lot of things I want to do right now is "no". So one of my MANY questions is 'WHY ARE men from Mars, and women are from Venus'? And yet the majority of us cohabit with such total opposites of ourselves. ;-8

joyce said...

I don't think our water tanks over here are corrugated but they are usually underground and called cisterns so maybe that's the difference. The underground part,not the name. Lol.

quiltpixie said...

the rippling of the sides makes them stronger, so they can hold more/ be bigger without rupturing from the water pressure.... Here in Canada we don't see them much, but we have grain silos which are generally corragated for that reason :-)

caramaena said...

I have seen a couple of straight sided tanks but never big ones, so the strength theory makes sense to me.

Molly said...

Have nothing helpful to contribute on the water tank issue, but only now read your previous post. I admire your honesty. I think we are all a little scared when expecting, in case something should go wrong. We worry that we won't be able to cope. But "they" [those ubiquitous wise ones!] say we're not given more than we have the ability to cope with. The real tragedy is when people are given perfectly perfect and healthy children, and instead of counting their blessings, abuse them...

meggie said...

Hi Everyone, Of COURSE it is for strength! Friends have under house tanks, & they are not corrugated, as in round tanks, but they have another form of corrugation in square shapes.
Thankyou for the answers.

meggie said...

I was not being facetious in that last answer. I meant to indicate that it was bleeding obvious, once pointed out, but my mind had not 'gone there'.
Thanks.